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Suffering through morning sickness

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Can Morning Sickness Actually Help Your Baby?

By Haley Burress

Suffering through morning sickness might take its toll on you, but it could have a silver lining for your baby

Up to 85 percent of pregnant women feel queasy during their first trimester. Morning sickness can be brutal on your body and on your morale, but a study published in the "Journal of Reproductive Toxicology" shows it's all worth it because it's beneficial for your baby.

Researchers looked at studies that monitored more than 850,000 pregnant women. Their review concluded that pregnant women who experienced nausea and vomiting had fewer miscarriages and gave birth to healthier babies, and only 6.4 percent had premature births. While 9.5 percent of women who didn't experience morning sickness had premature births.

Morning sickness is caused by a quick increase in the hormone human chorionic gonadotropin, which is released by the placenta in the first trimester. Now, if you're pregnant and not having any symptoms of morning sickness, don't worry. In fact, hooray for you! Severe morning sickness can cause a decrease in the quality of life for women who experience it. However, this study reminds those of us who are working on keeping crackers and water down that what we endure is, in fact, worth it in the end.

Keep your doctor informed of your morning sickness symptoms, especially if your symptoms are severe. Try the following methods to alleviate some of your suffering:

  • Eat small meals throughout the day.
  • Drink lots of water.
  • Nibble on candied ginger or peppermint.
  • Change when you take your prenatal vitamins.
  • Eat crackers.
  • Get more rest.